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Blues Magoos - Electric Comic Book FLAC album

Tracklist Hide Credits

A1 Pipe Dream
Written-By – Scala*, Gilbert*
2:25
A2 There's A Chance We Can Make It
Written-By – Scala*, Gilbert*
2:15
A3 Life Is Just A Cher O'Bowlies
Written-By – Thielhelm*, Scala*, Gilbert*
2:35
A4 Gloria
Written-By – Morrison*
6:00
A5 Intermission
Written-By – Esposito*
1:02
B1 Albert Common Is Dead
Written-By – Scala*, Gilbert*
1:46
B2 Summer Is The Man
Written-By – Esposito*, Gilbert*
2:56
B3 Baby, I Want You
Written-By – Thielhelm*, Gilbert*
2:40
B4 Let's Get Together
Written-By – J. Reed*
3:03
B5 Take My Love
Written-By – Scala*, Gilbert*
2:47
B6 Rush Hour
Written-By – Thielhelm*, Daking*, Esposito*, Scala*, Gilbert*
2:33
B7 That's All Folks 0:09

Credits

  • Liner Notes – Ray Fox
  • Producer – Art Polhemus, Bob Wyld

Notes

First cat.nr. on cover, second on label.

Released with a ''comic book'' insert.

Original copies have the cat.nr. in the top right hand corner.

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
SR 61104 Blues Magoos Electric Comic Book ‎(LP, Album, RP) Mercury SR 61104 US Unknown
SC 6272 Blues Magoos Electric Comic Book ‎(CD, Album, Ltd, RE) Sundazed Music SC 6272 US 2011
834247-1 Blues Magoos Electric Comic Book ‎(LP, Album) Mercury, Polygram 834247-1 Greece 1988
MG 21104 Blues Magoos Electric Comic Book ‎(LP, Album, Mono, RE) Mercury MG 21104 US Unknown
MEX 61104, ME 61104 Blues Magoos Electric Comic Book ‎(Reel, 4tr Stereo, Album) Mercury, Mercury MEX 61104, ME 61104 US 1967


Blues Magoos - Electric Comic Book FLAC album

Musician performer: Blues Magoos

Title: Electric Comic Book

Country: US

Date of release: 1967

Style: Psychedelic Rock

Genre: Rock

Size FLAC: 1239 mb

Rating: 4.4 / 5

Votes: 282

Other Formats: MMF MIDI AU XM MP1 AHX VOC

Related to Blues Magoos - Electric Comic Book FLAC Albums

Styphe
Still riding the psychedelic wave, and while several of the tracks are very good, the band moved into a rather iffy area, incorporating a bit of Monkees’ bizarre behavior with the idea that listeners needed an intermission, hence the song “Intermission,” and their goofy parody of the the Looney Tunes theme “That’s All Folks” which ended the album. On the other hand, if one considers this album to be in and of the times it was released, there are those who consider this to be a nearly perfect album, and while certainly not along the lines of the Beatles or Stones, the outing, which was recorded and pressed very well by Mercury Records, and goes on to embrace a variety and wide range of 60’s inspired garage rock and underground styles. Setting the stage, the album opens with the drug induced suggestiveness of “Pipe Dream,” where the bands shows some original and sonic chops and is perhaps the high water mark for the record, though the Magoos move onto some solid originals from there, and yes, manage to cover Van Morrison’s “Gloria,” a song that nearly everyone from Hendrix, The Doors, to The Shadows of Knight and many others have felt needed their own personal stamp, though The Blues Magoos manage to give it a bit harder edge.From there we move to side two, where the band seems to lose its steam overall, laying out a psychedelic journey of sorts with the opening track “Albert Common Is Dead,” a song that’s interesting enough, though doesn’t shine brightly or with the originality one would have hoped for, though perhaps this notion is based on my listening experience today, and in 1967 these songs were all a wondrous adventure of new doors opening on unexplored fields of sound. But don’t be too quick to dismiss side two, because there are two buried treasures to be found here, the Jimmy Reed song “Let’s Get Together” and “Rush Hour” which is a hands down solid masterpiece of garage and mid 60’s AM radio psychedelic rock, a song that brings to mind The Velvet Underground, though with the Porky Pig’s “That’s All Folks” drawing the experience to a close, I quickly committed the album to cassette tape, and edited out those two goofy tracks, which is no doubt why my vinyl copy is in such pristine condition.All and all Electric Comic Book a solid body of music, though it’s important to realize that one can not compare this album to say Dylan’s Blonde On Blonde or anything The Beatles were doing, because to so do would only make this record sound ridiculous and trivial, when in fact, it’s a knockout album from the genre and times it lived in.Review by Jenell Kesler
Styphe
Still riding the psychedelic wave, and while several of the tracks are very good, the band moved into a rather iffy area, incorporating a bit of Monkees’ bizarre behavior with the idea that listeners needed an intermission, hence the song “Intermission,” and their goofy parody of the the Looney Tunes theme “That’s All Folks” which ended the album. On the other hand, if one considers this album to be in and of the times it was released, there are those who consider this to be a nearly perfect album, and while certainly not along the lines of the Beatles or Stones, the outing, which was recorded and pressed very well by Mercury Records, and goes on to embrace a variety and wide range of 60’s inspired garage rock and underground styles. Setting the stage, the album opens with the drug induced suggestiveness of “Pipe Dream,” where the bands shows some original and sonic chops and is perhaps the high water mark for the record, though the Magoos move onto some solid originals from there, and yes, manage to cover Van Morrison’s “Gloria,” a song that nearly everyone from Hendrix, The Doors, to The Shadows of Knight and many others have felt needed their own personal stamp, though The Blues Magoos manage to give it a bit harder edge.From there we move to side two, where the band seems to lose its steam overall, laying out a psychedelic journey of sorts with the opening track “Albert Common Is Dead,” a song that’s interesting enough, though doesn’t shine brightly or with the originality one would have hoped for, though perhaps this notion is based on my listening experience today, and in 1967 these songs were all a wondrous adventure of new doors opening on unexplored fields of sound. But don’t be too quick to dismiss side two, because there are two buried treasures to be found here, the Jimmy Reed song “Let’s Get Together” and “Rush Hour” which is a hands down solid masterpiece of garage and mid 60’s AM radio psychedelic rock, a song that brings to mind The Velvet Underground, though with the Porky Pig’s “That’s All Folks” drawing the experience to a close, I quickly committed the album to cassette tape, and edited out those two goofy tracks, which is no doubt why my vinyl copy is in such pristine condition.All and all Electric Comic Book a solid body of music, though it’s important to realize that one can not compare this album to say Dylan’s Blonde On Blonde or anything The Beatles were doing, because to so do would only make this record sound ridiculous and trivial, when in fact, it’s a knockout album from the genre and times it lived in.Review by Jenell Kesler
Mave
The Blues Magoos launched their recording career with the LP Psychedelic Lollipop. The equally impressive Electric Comic Book refines the band's mix of rock ’n’ roll and day-glo psychedelia. That punchy yet playful approach animates such distinctive numbers as “Pipe Dream,” “Rush Hour,” “There’s a Chance We Can Make It” and “Albert Common Is Dead.”
Mave
The Blues Magoos launched their recording career with the LP Psychedelic Lollipop. The equally impressive Electric Comic Book refines the band's mix of rock ’n’ roll and day-glo psychedelia. That punchy yet playful approach animates such distinctive numbers as “Pipe Dream,” “Rush Hour,” “There’s a Chance We Can Make It” and “Albert Common Is Dead.”