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The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass - The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass FLAC album

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Concerto For Six Trumpets
Arranged By – Ehrlinger*Composed By – Telemann*
(10:49)
A1.a Allegro 1 4:02
A1.b Largo 1:32
A1.c Allegro 11 5:15
A2 Praeludium
Arranged By – Ehrlinger*Composed By – Bach*
5:04
A3 Sarabande
Arranged By – Ehrlinger*Composed By – Bach*
2:05
Concerto For Trombones
Arranged By – Ehrlinger*Composed By – Telemann*
(10:47)
B1.a Allegro 2:45
B1.b Grave 1 0:25
B1.c Aria 2:58
B1.d Grave 11 0:28
B1.e Vivace 2:10
B2 Fugue
Arranged By – Ehrlinger*Composed By – Bach*
3:03
B3 Sarabande
Arranged By – Ehrlinger*Composed By – Bach*
2:45

Notes

Track B1.b length listed as 2.25 and manually corrected to 0.25 with a pen.


The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass - The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass FLAC album

Musician performer: The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass

Title: The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass

Date of release: 1975

Style: Score

Genre: Classical / Stage & Screen

Size FLAC: 1636 mb

Rating: 4.1 / 5

Votes: 116

Other Formats: MIDI TTA MP4 AIFF MP1 ADX VQF

Related to The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass - The Hans Ehrlinger Swinging Baroque Brass FLAC Albums

Ndyardin
Hans Ehrlinger is well-known for his big band trombone albums on Studio One and other labels. Here, as the title of this album implies, he combines classical music with modern era jazz elements. The problem is that it is too much baroque and too little swing. A welcome spinet (or harpsichord?) can be heard here and there, but I find the trumpets on side A a little too much for my eardrums and the general solemnity made me yawn. Side B opens much livelier with a quick tune. I hoped for a good journey, but it soon falls into the same pattern, although the more pleasant trombones are the main sound here (as the trumpets were on side A). Ehrlinger is much too faithful and polite to the composers, Telemann and Bach, and his arrangements are not innovative in any way. One should probably be very fond of classical music to enjoy this album. Best tune: B5 ("Vivace").
Ndyardin
Hans Ehrlinger is well-known for his big band trombone albums on Studio One and other labels. Here, as the title of this album implies, he combines classical music with modern era jazz elements. The problem is that it is too much baroque and too little swing. A welcome spinet (or harpsichord?) can be heard here and there, but I find the trumpets on side A a little too much for my eardrums and the general solemnity made me yawn. Side B opens much livelier with a quick tune. I hoped for a good journey, but it soon falls into the same pattern, although the more pleasant trombones are the main sound here (as the trumpets were on side A). Ehrlinger is much too faithful and polite to the composers, Telemann and Bach, and his arrangements are not innovative in any way. One should probably be very fond of classical music to enjoy this album. Best tune: B5 ("Vivace").