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Thomas Mapfumo - Spirits To Bite Our Ears (The Single Collection 1977-1986) FLAC album

Tracklist

1 Tombi Wachina
2 Ngoma Yekwedu
3 Zeve Zeve
4 Nyamutamba Nemombe
5 Madiro
6 Tongosienda
7 Pidigori
8 Ruva Rangu
9 Pemberai
10 Pachinyakare
11 Kuyaura
12 Taireva
13 Dangurangu
14 Makandiwa
15 Haruna
16 Madhebhura
17 Joyce

Credits

  • Artwork By – Nathaniel Russell
  • Composed By, Arranged By – Thomas Mapfumo
  • Engineer – Bothwell Nyamhondera
  • Mastered By – Gary Hobish
  • Remastered By – Manny Rettinger

Thomas Mapfumo - Spirits To Bite Our Ears (The Single Collection 1977-1986) FLAC album

Musician performer: Thomas Mapfumo

Title: Spirits To Bite Our Ears (The Single Collection 1977-1986)

Genre: Folk, World, & Country

Size FLAC: 1832 mb

Rating: 4.2 / 5

Votes: 147

Other Formats: WAV MOD MP3 FLAC RA AHX DTS

Related to Thomas Mapfumo - Spirits To Bite Our Ears (The Single Collection 1977-1986) FLAC Albums

Thorgaginn
The deeply evocative and mesmerizing Chimurenga sound of Thomas Mapfumo and the Blacks Unlimited played an important part of the Zimbabwean revolutionary struggle for independence in the 1970s. The interlacing melodic polyrhythmic counterpoints in “Tongosienda” which feature the mbira, electric guitar and voice is nothing short of stunning. This is special considering that Shona, the language in which all of the album is sung, is not widely spoken outside of Zimbabwe. Another track “Madiro”, which in Shona refers to the freedom to do and to be without fear or constraint, is so rich and full of musical gems, that it is practically begging to be re-versioned. It is the kind of song that had it been created in the hyper economical musical environment of 1970s Jamaica, its riddims would be classics.
Thorgaginn
The deeply evocative and mesmerizing Chimurenga sound of Thomas Mapfumo and the Blacks Unlimited played an important part of the Zimbabwean revolutionary struggle for independence in the 1970s. The interlacing melodic polyrhythmic counterpoints in “Tongosienda” which feature the mbira, electric guitar and voice is nothing short of stunning. This is special considering that Shona, the language in which all of the album is sung, is not widely spoken outside of Zimbabwe. Another track “Madiro”, which in Shona refers to the freedom to do and to be without fear or constraint, is so rich and full of musical gems, that it is practically begging to be re-versioned. It is the kind of song that had it been created in the hyper economical musical environment of 1970s Jamaica, its riddims would be classics.