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Merzbow - Surabhi FLAC album

Tracklist

1 Vanamali And Shravan 15:51
2 Balaram 16:05
3 Yamuna Snan 20:15

Companies, etc.

  • Recorded At – Munemi House
  • Mixed At – Munemi House
  • Copyright (c) – Masami Akita
  • Phonographic Copyright (p) – Hypnagogia

Credits

  • Music By – Masami Akita
  • Photography [Cover] – Care For Cows

Notes

Recorded & Mixed at Munemihouse, Tokyo. Jan 2011.

Limited edition of 300.
Released in full colour Digipak.

Merzbow - Surabhi FLAC album

Musician performer: Merzbow

Title: Surabhi

Date of release: 2011

Style: Abstract, Noise, Experimental

Genre: Electronic

Size FLAC: 1752 mb

Rating: 4.1 / 5

Votes: 753

Other Formats: MIDI AC3 MP4 MP1 AU FLAC RA

Related to Merzbow - Surabhi FLAC Albums

Yozshubei
Is it me or is Merzbow getting more melodic and vaguely “kosmische” these days? The opening track ‘Vanamali and Shravan’ is a positive feast of layered electronic tones which, once you can hear your way through the stampede of digital hooves, is packed with one thousand beautiful melodies all exploding at once like fireworks of multiple colours. ‘Balaram’ is decidedly more subdued, and sumptuous glorpy Theremin-like lines shoot their way through an atmospheric pulsation zone along with the slightly more familiar bursts of Merzbow’s sandpapery rasps. ‘Yamuna Snan’ is even more complex, stereophonic explosions and ultra-processed digital water splashes all colliding in a glorious melange of unstoppable tidal-wave proportions. The merciless pounding rhythms and pulses which used to be one of Merzbow’s signature sounds has evolved into something much more ambiguous and benign, and results in music which is no less powerful but somehow more approachable and easier to listen to. (THE SOUND PROJECTOR)
Yozshubei
Is it me or is Merzbow getting more melodic and vaguely “kosmische” these days? The opening track ‘Vanamali and Shravan’ is a positive feast of layered electronic tones which, once you can hear your way through the stampede of digital hooves, is packed with one thousand beautiful melodies all exploding at once like fireworks of multiple colours. ‘Balaram’ is decidedly more subdued, and sumptuous glorpy Theremin-like lines shoot their way through an atmospheric pulsation zone along with the slightly more familiar bursts of Merzbow’s sandpapery rasps. ‘Yamuna Snan’ is even more complex, stereophonic explosions and ultra-processed digital water splashes all colliding in a glorious melange of unstoppable tidal-wave proportions. The merciless pounding rhythms and pulses which used to be one of Merzbow’s signature sounds has evolved into something much more ambiguous and benign, and results in music which is no less powerful but somehow more approachable and easier to listen to. (THE SOUND PROJECTOR)